Alternate Title

  • Droseraceae

Related Terms

  • Brazilian Drosera, carboxylic acids, Dionaea muscipula, Drosera, Drosera adelae, Drosera auriculata Backh. Ex Planch, Drosera binata, Drosera brevifolia, Drosera burmannii Vahl., Drosera capensis, Drosera chitinase, Drosera communis, Drosera gigantea, Drosera herba, Drosera intermedia, Drosera longifolia, Drosera madagascariensis, Drosera montana var., Drosera peltata, Drosera peltata Smith, Drosera peltata Smith var. lunata, Drosera peltata var. lunata, Drosera ramentacea, Drosera ramentacea Burch, Drosera rotundifolia, Drosera rotundifolia L., Drosera villosa var. graomogolensis, Drosera villosa var. villosa, droserone, flavonoids, flavonols, Madagascan Drosera, myricetin 3-0-galactoside, naphthoquinones, plumbagin, rossoliside, sundew, tentacles, youthwort.

Background

  • Drosera species are carnivorous plants that use their hairs to trap, immobilize, and digest insects. Preying on insects is their primary means of obtaining nutrients. Drosera species have reportedly been used medicinally at least since the 12th Century in Europe when an Italian doctor named Matthaeus Platearius described the plants as a cough remedy. Generally, Drosera is used for lower respiratory tract conditions, such as bronchitis, asthma, and coughs.
  • These early uses have some current data to support the clinical effectiveness of Drosera for the symptoms of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), including shortness of breath, wheezing, cough, sleep disturbances, and disability from chronic illness. Testing individual components of Drosera species has revealed anti-inflammatory, anti-spasmodic, and antibacterial effects. Although there is not a large amount of modern research that documents Drosera’s clinical effects, it is a fairly commonly used medicine alone or as part of a combination in roughly 200-300 registered medications.

Evidence Table

    Disclaimer

    These uses have been tested in humans or animals. Safety and effectiveness have not always been proven. Some of these conditions are potentially serious, and should be evaluated by a qualified healthcare provider.

    C – C


    C – C

*Key to grades:

Tradition

    Disclaimer

    The below uses are based on tradition, scientific theories, or limited research. They often have not been thoroughly tested in humans, and safety and effectiveness have not always been proven. Some of these conditions are potentially serious, and should be evaluated by a qualified healthcare provider. There may be other proposed uses that are not listed below.

Dosing

    Disclaimer

    The below doses are based on scientific research, publications, traditional use, or expert opinion. Many herbs and supplements have not been thoroughly tested, and safety and effectiveness may not be proven. Brands may be made differently, with variable ingredients, even within the same brand. The below doses may not apply to all products. You should read product labels, and discuss doses with a qualified healthcare provider before starting therapy.

  • Adults (18 years and older)

    • There is no proven safe or effective dose for sundew due to a lack of available evidence.
    • Sundew has been taken by mouth in controlled doses for up to six months in individuals with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).
  • Children (under 18 years old)

    • There is no proven safe or effective dose for sundew in children.

Safety

    Disclaimer

    The U.S. Food and Drug Administration does not strictly regulate herbs and supplements. There is no guarantee of strength, purity or safety of products, and effects may vary. You should always read product labels. If you have a medical condition, or are taking other drugs, herbs, or supplements, you should speak with a qualified healthcare provider before starting a new therapy. Consult a healthcare provider immediately if you experience side effects.

  • Allergies

    • Avoid in patients with known allergy or sensitivity to Drosera, its constituents, or members of the Droseraceae family.
  • Side Effects and Warnings

    • There is a lack of safety data on the use of sundew for longer than six months.
  • Pregnancy and Breastfeeding

    • Sundew is not recommended for pregnant or breastfeeding women due to lack of safety data.

Interactions

    Disclaimer

    Most herbs and supplements have not been thoroughly tested for interactions with other herbs, supplements, drugs, or foods. The interactions listed below are based on reports in scientific publications, laboratory experiments, or traditional use. You should always read product labels. If you have a medical condition, or are taking other drugs, herbs, or supplements, you should speak with a qualified healthcare provider before starting a new therapy.

  • Interactions with Drugs

    • Sundew may have additive effects with antibiotics and antiasthma, anti-inflammatory, and antispasmodic drugs.
  • Interactions with Herbs and Dietary Supplements

    • Sundew may have additive effects with antibacterials and antiasthma, anti-inflammatory, and antispasmodic herbs and supplements.

Attribution

  • This information is based on a systematic review of scientific literature edited and peer-reviewed by contributors to the Natural Standard Research Collaboration ().

Bibliography

    Disclaimer

    Natural Standard developed the above evidence-based information based on a thorough systematic review of the available scientific articles. For comprehensive information about alternative and complementary therapies on the professional level, go to . Selected references are listed below.

  • Didry N, Dubreuil L, Trotin F, et al. Antimicrobial activity of aerial parts of Drosera peltata Smith on oral bacteria. J Ethnopharmacol 1998;60(1):91-96.
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  • Ferreira DT, Andrei CC, Saridakis HO, et al. Antimicrobial activity and chemical investigation of Brazilian Drosera. Mem Inst Oswaldo Cruz 2004;99(7):753-755.
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  • Kamarainen T, Uusitalo J, Jalonen J, et al. Regional and habitat differences in 7-methyljuglone content of Finnish Drosera rotundifolia. Phytochemistry 2003;63(3):309-314.
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  • Kolodziej H, Pertz HH, and Humke A. Main constituents of a commercial Drosera fluid extract and their antagonist activity at muscarinic M3 receptors in guinea-pig ileum. Pharmazie 2002;57(3):201-203.
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  • Krenn L, Beyer G, Pertz HH, et al. In vitro antispasmodic and anti-inflammatory effects of Drosera rotundifolia. Arzneimittelforschung. 2004;54(7):402-405.
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  • Leclercq J. and Angenot L. [Drosera peltata and the standardization of drosera tincture]. J Pharm Belg 1984;39(5):269-274.
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  • Marczak L, Kawiak A, Lojkowska E, et al. Secondary metabolites in in vitro cultured plants of the genus Drosera. Phytochem Anal 2005;16(3):143-149.
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  • Mativandlela SP, Meyer JJ, Hussein AA, et al. Activity against Mycobacterium smegmatis and M. tuberculosis by extract of South African medicinal plants. Phytother Res 2008;22(6):841-845.
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  • Melzig MF, Pertz HH, and Krenn L. Anti-inflammatory and spasmolytic activity of extracts from Droserae herba. Phytomedicine 2001;8(3):225-229.
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  • Murali PM, Rajasekaran S, Paramesh P, et al. Plant-based formulation in the management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a randomized double-blind study. Respir Med 2006;100(1):39-45.
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  • Okabe T, Mori H, and Ohyama T. Deoxyribonuclease secreted from an insectivorous plant Drosera adelae. Nucleic Acids Symp Ser 1997;(37):127-128.
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  • Paper DH, Karall E, Kremser M, et al. Comparison of the antiinflammatory effects of Drosera rotundifolia and Drosera madagascariensis in the HET-CAM assay. Phytother Res 2005;19(4):323-326.
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  • Plachno BJ, Adamec L, Lichtscheidl IK, et al. Fluorescence labelling of phosphatase activity in digestive glands of carnivorous plants. Plant Biol (Stuttg) 2006;8(6):813-820.
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  • Krolicka A, Szpitter A, Maciag M, et al. Antibacterial and antioxidant activity of the secondary metabolites from in vitro cultures of Drosera aliciae. Biotechnol Appl Biochem 9-9-2008;
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  • Wang Q, Shu J, and Zeng L. [Chemical constituents of Drosera peltata Smith var. lunata (Buch.-Ham.) C.B. clarke collected in Tibet]. Zhongguo Zhong Yao Za Zhi 1998;23(11):683-4, 704.
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