Alternate Title

  • Pastinaca sativa

Related Terms

  • Apiaceae (family), Pastinaca sativa L., sweet parsnip, wild parsnip.
  • Note: This monograph does not include information on cow parsnip (Heracleum maximum) or wild parsnip (Angelica archanglica).

Background

    Evidence Table

      Disclaimer

      These uses have been tested in humans or animals. Safety and effectiveness have not always been proven. Some of these conditions are potentially serious, and should be evaluated by a qualified healthcare provider.

    *Key to grades:

    Tradition

      Disclaimer

      The below uses are based on tradition, scientific theories, or limited research. They often have not been thoroughly tested in humans, and safety and effectiveness have not always been proven. Some of these conditions are potentially serious, and should be evaluated by a qualified healthcare provider. There may be other proposed uses that are not listed below.

    Dosing

      Disclaimer

      The below doses are based on scientific research, publications, traditional use, or expert opinion. Many herbs and supplements have not been thoroughly tested, and safety and effectiveness may not be proven. Brands may be made differently, with variable ingredients, even within the same brand. The below doses may not apply to all products. You should read product labels, and discuss doses with a qualified healthcare provider before starting therapy.

    • Adults (18 years and older)

      • There is no proven safe or effective dose for parsnip in adults.
    • Children (under 18 years old)

      • There is no proven safe or effective dose for parsnip in children.

    Safety

      Disclaimer

      The U.S. Food and Drug Administration does not strictly regulate herbs and supplements. There is no guarantee of strength, purity or safety of products, and effects may vary. You should always read product labels. If you have a medical condition, or are taking other drugs, herbs, or supplements, you should speak with a qualified healthcare provider before starting a new therapy. Consult a healthcare provider immediately if you experience side effects.

    • Allergies

      • Avoid in individuals with a known allergy or hypersensitivity to parsnip (Pastinaca sativa). Parsnip has caused skin lesions and rash. Individuals allergic to birch pollen may have cross-sensitivity to parsnip.
    • Side Effects and Warnings

      • There are very few reports of parsnip and its adverse effects. Of the available literature, there are a few reports of phytodermatitis and phytophototoxicity in patients handling or ingesting parsnip. Parsnip has caused skin lesions and rash. Use cautiously in patients who are photosensitive or taking agents that may increase the chance of photosensitivity.
    • Pregnancy and Breastfeeding

      • Parsnip, as a medicinal agent, is not recommended in pregnant or breastfeeding women due to a lack of available scientific research.

    Interactions

      Disclaimer

      Most herbs and supplements have not been thoroughly tested for interactions with other herbs, supplements, drugs, or foods. The interactions listed below are based on reports in scientific publications, laboratory experiments, or traditional use. You should always read product labels. If you have a medical condition, or are taking other drugs, herbs, or supplements, you should speak with a qualified healthcare provider before starting a new therapy.

    • Interactions with Drugs

      • Parsnip contains polyacetylenes, which have shown cytotoxic activity. Caution is advised in patients taking anticancer agents, as the combination may have additive effects.
      • Parsnip may cause photosensitivity. Caution is advised in patients taking other agents that cause light sensitivity, as the combination may increase this side effect.
    • Interactions with Herbs and Dietary Supplements

      • Parsnip contains polyacetylenes, which have shown cytotoxic activity. Caution is advised in patients taking herbs or supplements with anticancer effects, as the combination may have additive effects.
      • Parsnip may cause photosensitivity. Caution is advised in patients taking other agents that cause light sensitivity, such as St. John’s wort, as the combination may increase this side effect.

    Attribution

    • This information is based on a systematic review of scientific literature edited and peer-reviewed by contributors to the Natural Standard Research Collaboration ().

    Bibliography

      Disclaimer

      Natural Standard developed the above evidence-based information based on a thorough systematic review of the available scientific articles. For comprehensive information about alternative and complementary therapies on the professional level, go to . Selected references are listed below.

    • Aberer W. Occupational dermatitis from organically grown parsnip (Pastinaca sativa L.). Contact Dermatitis 1992;26(1):62.
      View Abstract
    • Bang Pedersen N, Pla Arles UB. Phototoxic reaction to parsnip and UV-A sunbed. Contact Dermatitis 1998;39(2):97.
      View Abstract
    • Egan CL, Sterling G. Phytophotodermatitis: a visit to Margaritaville. Cutis 1993;51(1):41-42.
      View Abstract
    • Eriksson NE. Clustering of foodstuffs in food hypersensitivity. An inquiry study in pollen allergic patients. Allergol.Immunopathol.(Madr.) 1984;12(1):28-32.
      View Abstract
    • Gral N, Beani JC, Bonnot D, et al. [Plasma levels of psoralens after celery ingestion]. Ann.Dermatol Venereol 1993;120(9):599-603.
      View Abstract
    • Hannuksela M, Lahti A. Immediate reactions to fruits and vegetables. Contact Dermatitis 1977;3(2):79-84.
      View Abstract
    • Lutchman L, Inyang V, Hodgkinson D. Phytophotodermatitis associated with parsnip picking. J.Accid.Emerg.Med. 1999;16(6):453-454.
      View Abstract
    • Poljacki M, Paravina M, Jovanovic M, et al. [Contact allergic dermatitis caused by plants]. Med Pregl. 1993;46(9-10):371-375.
      View Abstract
    • Poniecka H. [Plants as the cause of contact allergy diagnosed at the Dermatological Clinic, Medical Academy, in Bialystok]. Przegl.Dermatol 1990;77(4):262-265.
      View Abstract
    • Quickenden TI, Creamer JI. A study of common interferences with the forensic luminol test for blood. Luminescence. 2001;16(4):295-298.
      View Abstract
    • Vinokurov GI. [On dermatitis caused by the sweet parsnip plant]. Voen.Med.Zh. 1965;7:67-69.
      View Abstract
    • Zidorn C, Johrer K, Ganzera M, et al. Polyacetylenes from the Apiaceae vegetables carrot, celery, fennel, parsley, and parsnip and their cytotoxic activities. J Agric.Food Chem 4-6-2005;53(7):2518-2523.
      View Abstract