Alternate Title

  • Datura stramonium

Related Terms

  • Alkaloids, angel’s trumpet, apple of peru, atropine, belladonna alkaloids, complex-type oligosaccharide binding lectin, crazy tea, Datura arborea, D. aurea, D. candida, Datura inoxia, Datura L., Datura metel, D. sanguinea, Datura stramonium, Datura stramonium agglutinin, Datura
    stramonium L. var. tatula (L.) Torr., Datura suaveolens, Datura
    tatula L., devil’s seed, devil’s snare, devil’s trumpet, DSA, endemic nightshade, hyoscamine, Jamestown weed, jimsonweed, lectins, “loco” weed, mad hatter, malpitte, moonflower seed, nightshade, pods, scopolamine, sobi-lobi, Solanaceae (family), stinkweed, TAL, thorn apple, thornapple leaf, tolguacha, toxic alkaloids, tropane belladonna alkaloids, trumpet lily, zombie’s cucumber.

Background

  • Jimson weed (Datura stramonium) grows throughout the world and has been known as a hallucinogenic plant for centuries. It has reportedly been used by Shamans and native peoples during sacred rituals. In India, the smoke of jimson weed has been used to treat asthma.
  • Jimson weed may cause extreme toxicity including death. Even very small amounts may cause death. Jimson weed is therefore not used medicinally today, although some alkaloids from jimson weed are approved drugs.
  • In early research, jimson weed has been studied for asthma and chronic bronchitis, however, clinical evidence supporting any safe or effective use of jimson weed is lacking at this time.

Evidence Table

    Disclaimer

    These uses have been tested in humans or animals. Safety and effectiveness have not always been proven. Some of these conditions are potentially serious, and should be evaluated by a qualified healthcare provider.

*Key to grades:

Tradition

    Disclaimer

    The below uses are based on tradition, scientific theories, or limited research. They often have not been thoroughly tested in humans, and safety and effectiveness have not always been proven. Some of these conditions are potentially serious, and should be evaluated by a qualified healthcare provider. There may be other proposed uses that are not listed below.

Dosing

    Disclaimer

    The below doses are based on scientific research, publications, traditional use, or expert opinion. Many herbs and supplements have not been thoroughly tested, and safety and effectiveness may not be proven. Brands may be made differently, with variable ingredients, even within the same brand. The below doses may not apply to all products. You should read product labels, and discuss doses with a qualified healthcare provider before starting therapy.

  • Adults (18 years and older)

    • There is no proven safe or effective dose for jimson weed. Jimson weed may cause extreme toxicity.
  • Children (under 18 years old)

    • There is no proven safe or effective dose for jimson weed, and use in children is not recommended. Jimson weed may cause extreme toxicity and even small amounts may cause death in children.

Safety

    Disclaimer

    The U.S. Food and Drug Administration does not strictly regulate herbs and supplements. There is no guarantee of strength, purity or safety of products, and effects may vary. You should always read product labels. If you have a medical condition, or are taking other drugs, herbs, or supplements, you should speak with a qualified healthcare provider before starting a new therapy. Consult a healthcare provider immediately if you experience side effects.

  • Allergies

    • Avoid with a known allergy or hypersensitivity to jimson weed, its constituents, other Datura species, or other plants in the nightshade family, such as tobacco, peppers, eggplant, potatoes, and tomatoes.
  • Side Effects and Warnings

    • Jimson weed may cause extreme toxicity including death. Even very small amounts may cause death.
    • Jimson weed may cause rapid heart rate, life threatening abnormal heart rhythm, high blood pressure, respiratory arrest, psychosis, delirium, disorientation, hallucinations, seizures, amnesia, coma, and may worsen neurological disorders.
    • Jimson weed may increase the risk of bleeding. Caution is advised in patients with bleeding disorders or taking drugs that may increase the risk of bleeding. Dosing adjustments may be necessary.
    • Jimson weed may also cause liver damage, kidney damage, difficulty urinating or urinary retention, and blurred vision.
  • Pregnancy and Breastfeeding

    • Jimson weed is not recommended in pregnant or breastfeeding women due to potential for extreme toxicity.

Interactions

    Disclaimer

    Most herbs and supplements have not been thoroughly tested for interactions with other herbs, supplements, drugs, or foods. The interactions listed below are based on reports in scientific publications, laboratory experiments, or traditional use. You should always read product labels. If you have a medical condition, or are taking other drugs, herbs, or supplements, you should speak with a qualified healthcare provider before starting a new therapy.

  • Interactions with Drugs

    • Jimson weed may increase the risk of bleeding when taken with drugs that increase the risk of bleeding. Some examples include aspirin, anticoagulants (“blood thinners”) such as warfarin (Coumadin®) or heparin, anti-platelet drugs such as clopidogrel (Plavix®), and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs such as ibuprofen (Motrin®, Advil®) or naproxen (Naprosyn®, Aleve®).
    • Jimson weed may increase the amount of drowsiness caused by some drugs. Examples include benzodiazepines such as lorazepam (Ativan®) or diazepam (Valium®), barbiturates such as phenobarbital, narcotics such as codeine, some antidepressants, and alcohol. Caution is advised while driving or operating machinery.
    • Jimson weed may alter blood pressure. Caution is advised in patients taking drugs that alter blood pressure.
    • Jimson weed may have additive effects when taken with anti-cholinergics, beta-blockers, cardiac glycosides, antimicrobials, analgesics, antipsychotics, diuretics, stimulants, drugs used for the eye, drugs used to alter heart rate or heart rhythm, drugs toxic to the liver, or drugs with anti-asthmatic, anticancer, anti-seizure, or immune altering properties.
  • Interactions with Herbs and Dietary Supplements

    • Jimson weed may increase the risk of bleeding when taken with herbs and supplements that are believed to increase the risk of bleeding. Multiple cases of bleeding have been reported with the use of Ginkgo biloba, and fewer cases with garlic and saw palmetto. Numerous other agents may theoretically increase the risk of bleeding, although this has not been proven in most cases.
    • Jimson weed may increase the amount of drowsiness caused by some herbs or supplements.
    • Jimson weed may alter blood pressure. Caution is advised in patients taking herbs or supplements that alter blood pressure.
    • Jimson weed may have additive effects when taken with anti-cholinergics, beta-blockers, alkaloids, cardiac glycosides, antimicrobials, analgesics, antipsychotics, diuretics, stimulants, herbs or supplements used for the eye, herbs or supplements used to alter heart rate or heart rhythm, herbs or supplements toxic to the liver, or herbs or supplements with anti-asthmatic, anticancer, anti-seizure, or immune altering properties.

Attribution

  • This information is based on a systematic review of scientific literature edited and peer-reviewed by contributors to the Natural Standard Research Collaboration ().

Bibliography

    Disclaimer

    Natural Standard developed the above evidence-based information based on a thorough systematic review of the available scientific articles. For comprehensive information about alternative and complementary therapies on the professional level, go to . Selected references are listed below.

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    View Abstract
  • Boumba, VA, Mitselou, A, and Vougiouklakis, T. Fatal poisoning from ingestion of Datura stramonium seeds. Vet Hum Toxicol. 2004;46(2):81-82.
    View Abstract
  • Calbo Mayo, JM, Barba Romero, MA, Broseta, Viana L, et al. [Accidental familiar poisoning by Datura stramonium]. An Med Interna 2004;21(8):415.
    View Abstract
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    View Abstract
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    View Abstract
  • Kurzbaum, A, Simsolo, C, Kvasha, L, and Blum, A. Toxic delirium due to Datura stramonium. Isr Med Assoc J 2001;3(7):538-539.
    View Abstract
  • Mikolich, JR, Paulson, GW, and Cross, CJ. Acute anticholinergic syndrome due to Jimson seed ingestion. Clinical and laboratory observation in six cases. Ann Intern Med. 1975;83(3):321-325.
    View Abstract
  • No authors listed. An alternative medicine treatment for Parkinson’s disease: results of a multicenter clinical trial. HP-200 in Parkinson’s Disease Study Group. J Altern.Complement Med. 1995;1(3):249-255.
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  • Roblot, F, Montaz, L, Delcoustal, M, et al. [Datura stramonium poisoning: the diagnosis is clinical, treatment is symptomatic]. Rev Med Interne 1995;16(3):187-190.
    View Abstract
  • Steenkamp, PA, Harding, NM, van Heerden, FR, et al. Fatal Datura poisoning: identification of atropine and scopolamine by high performance liquid chromatography/photodiode array/mass spectrometry. Forensic Sci Int 10-4-2004;145(1):31-39.
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  • Vanderhoff, BT, and Mosser, KH. Jimson weed toxicity: management of anticholinergic plant ingestion. Am Fam Physician 1992;46(2):526-530.
    View Abstract