Hyacinth bean (Lablab spp.)

While some complementary and alternative techniques have been studied scientifically, high-quality data regarding safety, effectiveness, and mechanism of action are limited or controversial for most therapies. Whenever possible, it is recommended that practitioners be licensed by a recognized professional organization that adheres to clearly published standards. In addition, before starting a new technique or engaging a practitioner, it is recommended that patients speak with their primary healthcare provider(s). Potential benefits, risks (including financial costs), and alternatives should be carefully considered. The below monograph is designed to provide historical background and an overview of clinically-oriented research, and neither advocates for or against the use of a particular therapy.

Related Terms

  • Arabinose, arcelin, arginase, batao, chè đ?u ván (Vietnamese), chikusetsusaponin IVa, country bean, cyanogenic glucosides, đ?u ván (Vietnamese), dolicholin, Dolichos lablab spp., Dolichos purpureus L., Egyptian bean, Fabaceae (family), field bean, French bean, glutamic-aspartic transaminase, Indian bean, lablab, Lablab lablab, Lablab niger Medikus, Lablab purpureus spp., lablab saponin I, Lablab vulgaris, lablabosides, oleanane-type triterpene bisdesmosides, phytoagglutinins, polyphenol oxidase, raffinose, stachyose, verbascose, Vigna artistata Piper.

Background

  • Hyacinth bean (Lablab spp.) is found in tropical areas, where it is commonly used as a food crop. Hyacinth bean has also been used as a medicine, poison, or fertilizer, and for ornamental purposes.

  • Hyacinth bean has been shown to decrease the risk of bleeding and may have contraceptive, insecticide, nutrition enhancement, antioxidant, and antiviral effects, however, there is currently a lack of human trials in these areas. Further research is necessary before conclusions may be made regarding using hyacinth bean for any condition.

Scientific Evidence

Uses

These uses have been tested in humans or animals. Safety and effectiveness have not always been proven. Some of these conditions are potentially serious, and should be evaluated by a qualified healthcare provider.

No available studies qualify for inclusion in the evidence table.

*Key to grades:

Tradition

The below uses are based on tradition or scientific theories. They often have not been thoroughly tested in humans, and safety and effectiveness have not always been proven. Some of these conditions are potentially serious and should be evaluated by a qualified health care professional.

  • Antifungal, antioxidant, contraception, food uses, HIV, insecticide, nutritional support.

Dosing

The below doses are based on scientific research, publications, traditional use, or expert opinion. Many herbs and supplements have not been thoroughly tested, and safety and effectiveness may not be proven. Brands may be made differently, with variable ingredients, even within the same brand. The below doses may not apply to all products. You should read product labels, and discuss doses with a qualified healthcare provider before starting therapy.

Adults (18 years and older)

  • Insufficient available evidence.

Children (under 18 years old)

  • Insufficient available evidence.

Safety

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration does not strictly regulate herbs and supplements. There is no guarantee of strength, purity or safety of products, and effects may vary. You should always read product labels. If you have a medical condition, or are taking other drugs, herbs, or supplements, you should speak with a qualified healthcare provider before starting a new therapy. Consult a healthcare provider immediately if you experience side effects.

Allergies

  • Avoid with known allergy or hypersensitivity to hyacinth bean (Lablab spp.), its constituents, or members of the Fabaceae family, such as peas and beans.

Side Effects and Warnings

  • Hyacinth bean may cause flatulence (gas).

  • Hyacinth bean may decrease the risk of bleeding. Caution is advised in patients with bleeding disorders or those taking drugs, herbs, or supplements that may increase the risk of bleeding. Dosing adjustments may be necessary.

  • Use cautiously in patients using fertility agents or in women trying to become pregnant, as hyacinth bean may have birth control effects.

  • Avoid consumption of dry seeds from the hyacinth bean plant, as they may be poisonous; seeds from the hyacinth bean plant should only be eaten after prolonged boiling.

  • Avoid in pregnant or breastfeeding women, due to a lack of available scientific evidence.

  • Avoid in individuals with known allergy or hypersensitivity to hyacinth bean (Lablab spp.), its constituents, or members of the Fabaceae family, such as peas and beans.

Pregnancy and Breastfeeding

  • Avoid in pregnant or breastfeeding women, due to a lack of safety information.

  • Information on hyacinth bean’s effects on lactation is currently lacking in the National Institute of Health’s Lactation and Toxicology Database (LactMed).

Interactions

Most herbs and supplements have not been thoroughly tested for interactions with other herbs, supplements, drugs, or foods. The interactions listed below are based on reports in scientific publications, laboratory experiments, or traditional use. You should always read product labels. If you have a medical condition, or are taking other drugs, herbs, or supplements, you should speak with a qualified healthcare provider before starting a new therapy.

Interactions with Drugs

  • Hyacinth bean may decrease the risk of bleeding when taken with drugs that increase the risk of bleeding. Some examples include aspirin, anticoagulants (blood thinners) such as warfarin (Coumadin®) or heparin, antiplatelet drugs such as clopidogrel (Plavix®), and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs such as ibuprofen (Motrin®, Advil®) or naproxen (Naprosyn®, Aleve®).

  • Hyacinth bean may also interact with agents that stimulate the immune system, anticancer agents, antifungals, antiretroviral agents, fertility agents, gastrointestinal agents, and proteinase inhibitors (antiviral agents).

Interactions with Herbs and Dietary Supplements

  • Hyacinth bean may decrease the risk of bleeding when taken with herbs and supplements that are believed to increase the risk of bleeding. Multiple cases of bleeding have been reported with the use of Ginkgo biloba, and fewer cases with garlic and saw palmetto. Numerous other agents may theoretically increase the risk of bleeding, although this has not been proven in most cases.

  • Hyacinth bean may also interact with anticancer herbs and supplements, antifungals, antioxidants, antivirals, fertility herbs and supplements, gastrointestinal herbs and supplements, and herbs and supplements that stimulate the immune system.

Author Information

  • This information is based on a systematic review of scientific literature edited and peer-reviewed by contributors to the Natural Standard Research Collaboration (www.naturalstandard.com).

References

Natural Standard developed the above evidence-based information based on a thorough systematic review of the available scientific articles. For comprehensive information about alternative and complementary therapies on the professional level, go to www.naturalstandard.com. Selected references are listed below.

  1. Abeke FO, Ogundipe SO, Sekoni AA, et al. Growth and subsequent egg production performance of shika-brown pullets fed graded levels of cooked Lablab purpureus beans. Pak J Biol Sci 2007;10(7):1056-1061. View Abstract
  2. Baligar VC, Fageria NK, Paiva AQ, et al. Light intensity effects on growth and micronutrient uptake by tropical legume cover crops. Journal of Plant Nutrition 2006;29(11):1958-1974.
  3. Gubesch M, Theler B, Dutta M, et al. Strategy for allergenicity assessment of ‘natural novel foods’: clinical and molecular investigation of exotic vegetables (water spinach, hyacinth bean and Ethiopian eggplant). Allergy 2007;62(11):1243-1250. View Abstract
  4. Janarthanan S, Suresh P, Radke G, et al. Arcelins from an Indian wild pulse, Lablab purpureus, and insecticidal activity in storage pests. J Agric.Food Chem 2008;56(5):1676-1682. View Abstract
  5. Kanade SR, Rao DH, Hegde RN, et al. The unique enzymatic function of field bean (Dolichos lablab) D-galactose specific lectin: a polyphenol oxidase. Glycoconj J 2009;26(5):535-545. View Abstract
  6. Kim YH, Woloshuk CP, Cho EH, et al. Cloning and functional expression of the gene encoding an inhibitor against Aspergillus flavus alpha-amylase, a novel seed lectin from Lablab purpureus (Dolichos lablab). Plant Cell Rep 2007;26(4):395-405. View Abstract
  7. Kone AW, Tondoh JE, Bernhard-Reversat F, et al. Changes in soil biological quality under legume- and maize-based farming systems in a humid savanna zone of Côte d’Ivoire. Biotechnol Agron Soc 2008;12(2):147-155.
  8. Latha VL, Rao RN, Nadimpalli SK. Affinity purification, physicochemical and immunological characterization of a galactose-specific lectin from the seeds of Dolichos lablab (Indian lablab beans). Protein Expr Purif 2006;45(2):296-306. View Abstract
  9. Qureshi SA, Midmore DJ, Syeda SS, et al. A comparison of alternative plant mixes for conservation bio-control by native beneficial arthropods in vegetable cropping systems in Queensland Australia. Bull Entomol Res 2010;100(1):67-73. View Abstract
  10. Rameshwaram NR, Karanam NK, Scharf C, et al. Complete primary structure of a newly characterized galactose-specific lectin from the seeds of Dolichos lablab. Glycoconj J 2009;26(2):161-172. View Abstract
  11. Schellenberger DL, Morse RD, Welbaum GE. Organic broccoli production on transition soils: Comparing cover crops, tillage and sidedress N. Renewable Agriculture & Food Systems 2009;24(2):85-91.
  12. Sufian MK, Hira T, Asano K, et al. Peptides derived from dolicholin, a phaseolin-like protein in country beans (Dolichos lablab), potently stimulate cholecystokinin secretion from enteroendocrine STC-1 cells. J Agric Food Chem 2007;55(22):8980-8986. View Abstract
  13. Vanlauwe B, Idrissa A, Diels J, et al. Plant age and rock phosphate effects on the organic resource quality of herbaceous legume residues and their N and P release dynamics. Agron Sustain Dev 2008;28(3):429-437.
  14. Vera-Nunez JA, Infante-Santiago JP, Velasco V, et al. Influence of P Fertilization on Biological Nitrogen Fixation in Herbaceous Legumes Grown in Acid Savannah Soils from the Tabasco State, Mexico. Journal of Sustainable Agriculture 2008;31(3):25-42.
  15. Yao H, Xie X, Li Y, et al. Legume lectin FRIL preserves neural progenitor cells in suspension culture in vitro. Clin Dev Immunol 2008;2008:531317. View Abstract

The information in this monograph is intended for informational purposes only, and is meant to help users better understand health concerns. Information is based on review of scientific research data, historical practice patterns, and clinical experience. This information should not be interpreted as specific medical advice. Users should consult with a qualified healthcare provider for specific questions regarding therapies, diagnosis and/or health conditions, prior to making therapeutic decisions.