Alternate Title

  • Parthenium argentatum

Related Terms

  • Argentatin, Asteraceae (family), Compositae (family), daisies, dandelion, goldenrod, guayule rubber plant, Parthenium argentatum (Gray)., ragweed, sunflower.

Background

  • Guayule (Parthenium argentatum) is native to the southwestern United States and may be a natural source of hypoallergenic latex because large quantities of rubber accumulated in its cells lack the latex proteins that cause allergic reactions. Preliminary tests show that guayule latex film may be an effective barrier to virus transmission, even after long-term storage.
  • There is currently insufficient evidence available in humans to support the use of guayule for any indication.

Evidence Table

    Disclaimer

    These uses have been tested in humans or animals. Safety and effectiveness have not always been proven. Some of these conditions are potentially serious, and should be evaluated by a qualified healthcare provider.

*Key to grades:

Tradition

    Disclaimer

    The below uses are based on tradition, scientific theories, or limited research. They often have not been thoroughly tested in humans, and safety and effectiveness have not always been proven. Some of these conditions are potentially serious, and should be evaluated by a qualified healthcare provider. There may be other proposed uses that are not listed below.

Dosing

    Disclaimer

    The below doses are based on scientific research, publications, traditional use, or expert opinion. Many herbs and supplements have not been thoroughly tested, and safety and effectiveness may not be proven. Brands may be made differently, with variable ingredients, even within the same brand. The below doses may not apply to all products. You should read product labels, and discuss doses with a qualified healthcare provider before starting therapy.

  • Adults (18 years and older):

    • There is no proven safe or effective dose for guayule in adults.
  • Children (younger than 18 years):

    • There is no proven safe or effective dose for guayule in children.

Safety

    Disclaimer

    The U.S. Food and Drug Administration does not strictly regulate herbs and supplements. There is no guarantee of strength, purity or safety of products, and effects may vary. You should always read product labels. If you have a medical condition, or are taking other drugs, herbs, or supplements, you should speak with a qualified healthcare provider before starting a new therapy. Consult a healthcare provider immediately if you experience side effects.

  • Allergies

    • Avoid in individuals with a known allergy or hypersensitivity to guayule (Parthenium argentatum), its constituents, or members of the Asteraceae/Compositae family, such as dandelion, goldenrod, ragweed, sunflower, and daisies.
    • Guayule is being pursued as a hypoallergenic source of latex because in laboratory studies, its proteins do not cross-react with antibodies raised against latex proteins in conventional Hevea brasiliensis latex products.
  • Side Effects and Warnings

    • There is insufficient evidence in humans to support the use of guayule for any indication. Use guayule cautiously in patients with compromised hepatic (liver) function or taking agents metabolized by the cytochrome P450 pathways.
  • Pregnancy and Breastfeeding

    • Guayule is not recommended in pregnant or breastfeeding women due to a lack of available scientific evidence.

Interactions

    Disclaimer

    Most herbs and supplements have not been thoroughly tested for interactions with other herbs, supplements, drugs, or foods. The interactions listed below are based on reports in scientific publications, laboratory experiments, or traditional use. You should always read product labels. If you have a medical condition, or are taking other drugs, herbs, or supplements, you should speak with a qualified healthcare provider before starting a new therapy.

  • Interactions with Drugs

    • Guayule may interfere with the way the body processes certain drugs using the liver’s cytochrome P450 system. As a result, the levels of these drugs may be altered, and may increase/decrease the effects or increase potentially serious adverse reactions. If using any medications, check the package insert and speak with a qualified healthcare professional, including a pharmacist, about possible interactions.
    • Constituents from guayule showed cytotoxic effects on cancer cell lines. Although the clinical significance is unknown, caution is advised in patients taking anticancer agents due to unknown combined effects.
  • Interactions with Herbs and Dietary Supplements

    • Guayule may interfere with the way the body processes certain herbs or supplements using the liver’s cytochrome P450 system. As a result, the levels of other herbs or supplements may be too high in the blood. It may also alter the effects that other herbs or supplements possibly have on the P450 system, such as chamomile, Echinacea, oregano, and St. John’s wort.
    • Constituents from guayule showed cytotoxic effects on cancer cell lines. Although the clinical significance is unknown, caution is advised in patients taking anticancer agents due to unknown combined effects.

Attribution

  • This information is based on a systematic review of scientific literature edited and peer-reviewed by contributors to the Natural Standard Research Collaboration ().

Bibliography

    Disclaimer

    Natural Standard developed the above evidence-based information based on a thorough systematic review of the available scientific articles. For comprehensive information about alternative and complementary therapies on the professional level, go to . Selected references are listed below.

  • Carey AB, Cornish K, Schrank P, et al. Cross-reactivity of alternate plant sources of latex in subjects with systemic IgE-mediated sensitivity to Hevea brasiliensis latex. Ann.Allergy Asthma Immunol 1995;74(4):317-320.
    View Abstract
  • Cornish K, Lytle CD. Viral impermeability of hypoallergenic, low protein, guayule latex films. J.Biomed.Mater.Res. 12-5-1999;47(3):434-437.
    View Abstract
  • Pan Z, Durst F, Werck-Reichhart D, et al. The major protein of guayule rubber particles is a cytochrome P450. Characterization based on cDNA cloning and spectroscopic analysis of the solubilized enzyme and its reaction products. J.Biol.Chem. 4-14-1995;270(15):8487-8494.
    View Abstract
  • Pan Z, Herickhoff L, Backhaus RA. Cloning, characterization, and heterologous expression of cDNAs for farnesyl diphosphate synthase from the guayule rubber plant reveals that this prenyltransferase occurs in rubber particles. Arch.Biochem.Biophys. 8-1-1996;332(1):196-204.
    View Abstract
  • Parra-Delgado H, Garcia-Pillado F, Sordo M, et al. Evaluation of the cytotoxicity, cytostaticity and genotoxicity of argentatins A and B from Parthenium argentatum (Gray). Life Sci 10-14-2005;77(22):2855-2865.
    View Abstract
  • Siler DJ, Cornish K, Hamilton RG. Absence of cross-reactivity of IgE antibodies from subjects allergic to Hevea brasiliensis latex with a new source of natural rubber latex from guayule (Parthenium argentatum). J.Allergy Clin.Immunol. 1996;98(5 Pt 1):895-902.
    View Abstract