Related Terms

  • Apiose, big turnip, biscuit root, chocolate tip, coniferyl ferulate, cough root, coumarin glycosides, cous (Nimipu), desert parnip, fernleaf biscuit root, fern-leafed lomatium, ferula dissolute, ferulic acid, flavonoids, Indian balsam, Indian carrot, Indian consumption plant, Indian desert parsnip, Indian parsnip, leptotaenia, leptotaenia dissecta, lomatium, Lomatium californicum, Lomatium dissectum, Lomatium grayi, Lomatium nuttallii, Lomatium suksdorfii, luteolin, pungent desert parsley, suksdorfin, tetronic acid, tohza, toza, Umbelliferae (family), wild black carrot, wild carrot.

Background

  • Lomatium is a genus of 70 to 80 perennial herbs, which are native to western North America. Species include Lomatium dissectum, Lomatium grayi, Lumatium nuttalii, and Lomatium suksdorfii. Much of the information reported by scientific and by traditional or historical sources refers to desert parsley (Lomatium dissectum).
  • Desert parsley has been used by many Native American tribes to treat a wide variety of infections, mainly of the lungs. Historical and traditional sources report that desert parsley was used during the influenza pandemic of 1917 with positive results.
  • Lomatium species have inhibited rotavirus and HIV-1 replication in some laboratory studies.
  • There is limited scientific and human research involving Lomatium dissectum or any other species of Lomatium. More high quality scientific and human studies are needed before any conclusions about the clinical use of desert parsley can be made.

Evidence Table

    Disclaimer

    These uses have been tested in humans or animals. Safety and effectiveness have not always been proven. Some of these conditions are potentially serious, and should be evaluated by a qualified healthcare provider.

*Key to grades:

Tradition

    Disclaimer

    The below uses are based on tradition, scientific theories, or limited research. They often have not been thoroughly tested in humans, and safety and effectiveness have not always been proven. Some of these conditions are potentially serious, and should be evaluated by a qualified healthcare provider. There may be other proposed uses that are not listed below.

Dosing

    Disclaimer

    The below doses are based on scientific research, publications, traditional use, or expert opinion. Many herbs and supplements have not been thoroughly tested, and safety and effectiveness may not be proven. Brands may be made differently, with variable ingredients, even within the same brand. The below doses may not apply to all products. You should read product labels, and discuss doses with a qualified healthcare provider before starting therapy.

  • Adults (over 18 years old)

    • There is no proven safe or effective dose for desert parsley. Nonetheless, desert parsley extracts with the resin removed (lomatium isolates) have been taken in doses of 1-3 milliliters daily. Desert parsley has also been taken by mouth as a tea or tincture.
  • Children (under 18 years old)

    • There is no proven safe or effective dose for desert parsley in children.

Safety

    Disclaimer

    The U.S. Food and Drug Administration does not strictly regulate herbs and supplements. There is no guarantee of strength, purity or safety of products, and effects may vary. You should always read product labels. If you have a medical condition, or are taking other drugs, herbs, or supplements, you should speak with a qualified healthcare provider before starting a new therapy. Consult a healthcare provider immediately if you experience side effects.

  • Allergies

    • Avoid in individuals with a known allergy or hypersensitivity to desert parsley (Lomatium dissectum).
  • Side Effects and Warnings

    • Desert parsley is generally recognized as safe in traditional and historical sources. However, resins in desert parsley extracts may cause rash in susceptible people that may not be improved with cortisone or antihistamine. To avoid this rash, traditional sources suggest using lomatium isolates, with the resins removed. Unsubstantiated sources also recommend testing a small area with the tincture for a reaction before using, to reduce the possibility of a reaction.
    • High doses of desert parsley may result in nausea. Desert parsley contains coumarin derivatives and may increase the risk of bleeding.
  • Pregnancy & Breastfeeding

    • Desert parsley is not recommended in pregnant or breastfeeding women due to a lack of available scientific research.

Interactions

    Disclaimer

    Most herbs and supplements have not been thoroughly tested for interactions with other herbs, supplements, drugs, or foods. The interactions listed below are based on reports in scientific publications, laboratory experiments, or traditional use. You should always read product labels. If you have a medical condition, or are taking other drugs, herbs, or supplements, you should speak with a qualified healthcare provider before starting a new therapy.

  • Interactions with Drugs

    • Lomatium dissectum contains coumarin derivatives. Thus, desert parlsey may increase the risk of bleeding when taken with drugs that increase the risk of bleeding. Some examples include aspirin, anticoagulants (“blood thinners”) such as warfarin (Coumadin®) or heparin, anti-platelet drugs such as clopidogrel (Plavix®), and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs such as ibuprofen (Motrin®, Advil®) or naproxen (Naprosyn®, Aleve®).
    • Although not well studied in humans, the methylene chloride extract of Lomatium californicum seeds showed antifungal activity against Colletotrichum fragariae. Caution is advised when taking desert parsley with other antifungal agents due to additive effects.
    • Although not well studied in humans, Lomatium species may inhibit HIV-1 replication. Caution is advised when taking with antiviral agents due to additive effects.
  • Interactions with Herbs & Dietary Supplements

    • Lomatium dissectum contains coumarin derivatives. Thus, desert parsley may increase the risk of bleeding when taken with herbs and supplements that are believed to increase the risk of bleeding. Multiple cases of bleeding have been reported with the use of Ginkgo biloba, and fewer cases with garlic and saw palmetto. Numerous other agents may theoretically increase the risk of bleeding, although this has not been proven in most cases.
    • Although not well studied in humans, the methylene chloride extract of Lomatium californicum seeds showed antifungal activity against Colletotrichum fragariae. Caution is advised when taking desert parsley with other herbs with antifungal activity due to additive effects.
    • Although not well studied in humans, Lomatium species may inhibit HIV-1 replication. Caution is advised when taking with antiviral agents due to additive effects.

Attribution

  • This information is based on a systematic review of scientific literature edited and peer-reviewed by contributors to the Natural Standard Research Collaboration ().

Bibliography

    Disclaimer

    Natural Standard developed the above evidence-based information based on a thorough systematic review of the available scientific articles. For comprehensive information about alternative and complementary therapies on the professional level, go to . Selected references are listed below.

  • Alstat E. Lomatium dissectum and fresh corn silk. NHAA International Conference 1995;116-125.
  • Chou SC, Everngam MC, Sturtz G, et al. Antibacterial activity of components from Lomatium californicum. Phytother Res 2006;20(2):153-156.
    View Abstract
  • Lee KH, Soine TO. Coumarins. VII. The coumarins of Lomatium nuttallii. J Pharm Sci 1968;57(5):865-868.
    View Abstract
  • Lee TT, Kashiwada Y, Huang L, et al. Suksdorfin: an anti-HIV principle from Lomatium suksdorfii, its structure-activity correlation with related coumarins, and synergistic effects with anti-AIDS nucleosides. Bioorg.Med Chem 1994;2(10):1051-1056.
    View Abstract
  • McCutcheon AR, Roberts TE, Gibbons E, et al. Antiviral screening of British Columbian medicinal plants. J Ethnopharmacol 12-1-1995;49(2):101-110.
    View Abstract
  • Meepagala KM, Sturtz G, Wedge DE, et al. Phytotoxic and antifungal compounds from two Apiaceae species, Lomatium californicum and Ligusticum hultenii, rich sources of Z-ligustilide and apiol, respectively. J Chem Ecol 2005;31(7):1567-1578.
    View Abstract
  • VanWagenen BC, Huddleston J, Cardellina JH. Native American food and medicinal plants, 8. Water-soluble constituents of Lomatium dissectum. J Nat Prod. 1988;51(1):136-141.
    View Abstract