Alternate Title

  • Stellaria

Related Terms

  • Borneol, Caryophyllaceae (family), common chickweed, linalool, menthol, Stellaria holostea, Stellaria longipes, Stellaria media, Stellaria media Cyrill., Stellaria media Villars, terpenes.

Background

  • Common chickweed (Stellaria media) is a wild plant that has traditionally been collected for human consumption in southeast Spain. There is also evidence of use of Stellaria holostea in Italy, Canada, and Scotland.
  • Herbal textbooks recommend chickweed (poultice, ointment, or oil) as a topical remedy for skin conditions including cuts, wounds, itching, irritation, psoriasis, and eczema. Currently, there is a lack of high quality scientific evidence supporting the use of chickweed for any medical condition.

Evidence Table

    Disclaimer

    These uses have been tested in humans or animals. Safety and effectiveness have not always been proven. Some of these conditions are potentially serious, and should be evaluated by a qualified healthcare provider.

*Key to grades:

Tradition

    Disclaimer

    The below uses are based on tradition, scientific theories, or limited research. They often have not been thoroughly tested in humans, and safety and effectiveness have not always been proven. Some of these conditions are potentially serious, and should be evaluated by a qualified healthcare provider. There may be other proposed uses that are not listed below.

Dosing

    Disclaimer

    The below doses are based on scientific research, publications, traditional use, or expert opinion. Many herbs and supplements have not been thoroughly tested, and safety and effectiveness may not be proven. Brands may be made differently, with variable ingredients, even within the same brand. The below doses may not apply to all products. You should read product labels, and discuss doses with a qualified healthcare provider before starting therapy.

  • Adults (over 18 years old)

    • There is no proven safe or effective dose of chickweed in adults.
  • Children (under 18 years old)

    • There is no proven safe or effective dose of chickweed in children.

Safety

    Disclaimer

    The U.S. Food and Drug Administration does not strictly regulate herbs and supplements. There is no guarantee of strength, purity or safety of products, and effects may vary. You should always read product labels. If you have a medical condition, or are taking other drugs, herbs, or supplements, you should speak with a qualified healthcare provider before starting a new therapy. Consult a healthcare provider immediately if you experience side effects.

  • Allergies

    • Avoid in individuals with a known allergy or hypersensitivity to chickweed, its constituents, or members of the Caryophyllaceae family.
  • Side Effects and Warnings

    • Chickweed is possibly safe in non-allergic people when ingested in food amounts, based on its use as a wild edible plant in Spain.
    • The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) does not list chickweed on its Generally Recognized as Safe (GRAS) list.
  • Pregnancy and Breastfeeding

    • Chickweed is not recommended in pregnant or breastfeeding women due to a lack of available scientific evidence.

Interactions

    Disclaimer

    Most herbs and supplements have not been thoroughly tested for interactions with other herbs, supplements, drugs, or foods. The interactions listed below are based on reports in scientific publications, laboratory experiments, or traditional use. You should always read product labels. If you have a medical condition, or are taking other drugs, herbs, or supplements, you should speak with a qualified healthcare provider before starting a new therapy.

  • Interactions with Drugs

    • Use cautiously with antibiotics, due to possible additive effects.
    • Use cautiously with anticancer and antiviral agents, due to possible additive effects.
    • Use cautiously with blood pressure medications, due to possible additive effects.
  • Interactions with Herbs and Dietary Supplements

    • Use cautiously with antibacterial herbs and supplements, due to possible additive effects.
    • Use cautiously with anticancer and antiviral herbs and supplements, due to possible additive effects.
    • Use cautiously in herbs and supplements that alter blood pressure, due to possible additive effects.

Attribution

  • This information is based on a systematic review of scientific literature edited and peer-reviewed by contributors to the Natural Standard Research Collaboration ().

Bibliography

    Disclaimer

    Natural Standard developed the above evidence-based information based on a thorough systematic review of the available scientific articles. For comprehensive information about alternative and complementary therapies on the professional level, go to . Selected references are listed below.

  • [Antiallergic agents from the chickweed]. Schweiz.Rundsch.Med.Prax. 11-10-2004;93(46):1936.
    View Abstract
  • Guarrera PM, Forti G, Marignoli S. Ethnobotanical and ethnomedicinal uses of plants in the district of Acquapendente (Latium, Central Italy). J Ethnopharmacol. 1-15-2005;96(3):429-444.
    View Abstract
  • Guil JL, Rodriguez-Garcia I, Torija E. Nutritional and toxic factors in selected wild edible plants. Plant Foods Hum.Nutr. 1997;51(2):99-107.
    View Abstract
  • Jovanovic M, Mimica-Dukic N, Poljacki M, et al. Erythema multiforme due to contact with weeds: a recurrence after patch testing. Contact Dermatitis 2003;48(1):17-25.
    View Abstract
  • Jovanovic M, Poljacki M, Mimica-Dukic N, et al. Sesquiterpene lactone mix patch testing supplemented with dandelion extract in patients with allergic contact dermatitis, atopic dermatitis and non-allergic chronic inflammatory skin diseases. Contact Dermatitis 2004;51(3):101-110.
    View Abstract
  • Kumarasamy Y, Cox PJ, Jaspars M, et al. Screening seeds of Scottish plants for antibacterial activity. J Ethnopharmacol 2002;83(1-2):73-77.
    View Abstract
  • Lin LT, Liu LT, Chiang LC, et al. In vitro anti-hepatoma activity of fifteen natural medicines from Canada. Phytother.Res 2002;16(5):440-444.
    View Abstract
  • Morita H, Iizuka T, Choo CY, et al. Dichotomins J and K, vasodilator cyclic peptides from Stellaria dichotoma. J Nat.Prod. 2005;68(11):1686-1688.
    View Abstract
  • Poljacki M, Jovanovic M, Boza P, et al. [Is Vojvodina a risk area for contact weed allergies?]. Med Pregl. 2005;58(3-4):123-126.
    View Abstract