Alternate Title

  • Helleborus niger

Related Terms

  • Anemonic acid, anemonin, bear’s-foot, cardioactive saponins, Christ Herbe, Christmas flower, Christmas herb, Christmas rose, Christmas rose plant, helleborein, helleborin, Helleborus niger, Helleborus nigra, melampode, protoanemoni, Ranunculin, ranunculosides, Ranunculaceae (family), saponins, sesquiterpene lactone glycosides, setter grass, setter wort, unsaturated lactone, winter rose.

Background

  • Black hellebore (Helleborus niger, Helleborus nigra) is a perennial plant, native to Central and Southern Europe, Greece, and Asia Minor, and is cultivated largely in the United States as a garden plant. Black hellebore is not the same as false hellebore, American hellebore, white hellebore, or other Veratrum species.
  • Black hellebore is a poisonous plant that is toxic when taken in even small-to-moderate doses and should not be used without the supervision of a medical professional. It was formerly used for palsy, insanity, dropsy, and epilepsy but is seldom currently used for these or any other uses.

Evidence Table

    Disclaimer

    These uses have been tested in humans or animals. Safety and effectiveness have not always been proven. Some of these conditions are potentially serious, and should be evaluated by a qualified healthcare provider.

*Key to grades:

Tradition

    Disclaimer

    The below uses are based on tradition, scientific theories, or limited research. They often have not been thoroughly tested in humans, and safety and effectiveness have not always been proven. Some of these conditions are potentially serious, and should be evaluated by a qualified healthcare provider. There may be other proposed uses that are not listed below.

Dosing

    Disclaimer

    The below doses are based on scientific research, publications, traditional use, or expert opinion. Many herbs and supplements have not been thoroughly tested, and safety and effectiveness may not be proven. Brands may be made differently, with variable ingredients, even within the same brand. The below doses may not apply to all products. You should read product labels, and discuss doses with a qualified healthcare provider before starting therapy.

  • Adults (18 years and older)

    • There is no proven safe or effective dose for black hellebore. Black hellebore has been taken by mouth as a fluid extract, solid extract, powered root, or decoction. Black hellebore is known to be toxic when taken in even small-to-moderate doses and should not be used without the supervision of a medical professional.
  • Children (under 18 years old)

    • There is no proven safe or effective dose for black hellebore, and use in children is not recommended.

Safety

    Disclaimer

    The U.S. Food and Drug Administration does not strictly regulate herbs and supplements. There is no guarantee of strength, purity or safety of products, and effects may vary. You should always read product labels. If you have a medical condition, or are taking other drugs, herbs, or supplements, you should speak with a qualified healthcare provider before starting a new therapy. Consult a healthcare provider immediately if you experience side effects.

  • Allergies

    • Avoid in patients with a known allergy or sensitivity to black hellebore, its constituents, or members of the Ranunculaceae family.
  • Side Effects and Warnings

    • Black hellebore should only be used under supervision of a medical professional due to its potential toxic effects.
    • Symptoms of black hellebore poisoning include scratchy throat or mouth, salivation, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, dizziness, shortness of breath, heart rate or heart rhythm changes, and suffocation. Black hellebore may cause irritation, bruises, redness of the skin or inflammation when the skin comes in contact with the fresh plant.
    • Avoid in patients with heart disease or stomach irritation.
  • Pregnancy and Breastfeeding

    • Avoid in pregnant or breastfeeding women. Black hellebore may have abortion inducing properties.

Interactions

    Disclaimer

    Most herbs and supplements have not been thoroughly tested for interactions with other herbs, supplements, drugs, or foods. The interactions listed below are based on reports in scientific publications, laboratory experiments, or traditional use. You should always read product labels. If you have a medical condition, or are taking other drugs, herbs, or supplements, you should speak with a qualified healthcare provider before starting a new therapy.

  • Interactions with Drugs

    • Black hellebore may have additive effects with heart stimulants (digoxin), heart depressants (quinine), diuretics, laxatives, drugs used for the stomach, or narcotics.
  • Interactions with Herbs and Dietary Supplements

    • Black hellebore may have additive effects with heart stimulants (Foxglove, Digitalis spp.), heart depressants (Cinchona pubscens), diuretics (horsetail, licorice), laxatives, or herbs and supplements used for the stomach.

Attribution

  • This information is based on a systematic review of scientific literature edited and peer-reviewed by contributors to the Natural Standard Research Collaboration ().

Bibliography

    Disclaimer

    Natural Standard developed the above evidence-based information based on a thorough systematic review of the available scientific articles. For comprehensive information about alternative and complementary therapies on the professional level, go to . Selected references are listed below.