Alternate Title

  • Lagerstroemia speciosa L.

Related Terms

  • Banaba extract, banglang (Vietnam), bang-lang (Cambobia), bungor (Malaya, Sabah), Byers wonderful white crapemyrtle, crape myrtle, crepe myrtle, corosolic acid, ellagitannins (flosin B, reginin A, lagerstroemin), flos-reginae Retz, Glucosol, glucosal, intanin (Thailand), jarul (India), Lagerstroemia, Lagerstroemia indica, Lagerstroemia parviflora, Lagerstroemia speciosa, lasubine, Lythraceae (family), lythraceae alkaloids, Munchausia speciosa, Pride-of-India, pyinma, Queen’s crape myrtle, Queens flower.

Background

  • Banaba is a medicinal plant that grows in India, Southeast Asia, and the Philippines. Banaba has been used for blood sugar control. The hypoglycemic (blood sugar lowering) effect of banaba leaf extract is similar to that of insulin, which induces glucose transport from the blood into body cells.
  • Currently, research suggests that taking banaba extract, standardized to 1% corosolic acid, by mouth may lower blood sugar in people with type 2 diabetes, however further evidence is needed before a firm conclusion can be made.

Evidence Table

    Disclaimer

    These uses have been tested in humans or animals. Safety and effectiveness have not always been proven. Some of these conditions are potentially serious, and should be evaluated by a qualified healthcare provider.

    D – D


    C – C

*Key to grades:

Tradition

    Disclaimer

    The below uses are based on tradition, scientific theories, or limited research. They often have not been thoroughly tested in humans, and safety and effectiveness have not always been proven. Some of these conditions are potentially serious, and should be evaluated by a qualified healthcare provider. There may be other proposed uses that are not listed below.

Dosing

    Disclaimer

    The below doses are based on scientific research, publications, traditional use, or expert opinion. Many herbs and supplements have not been thoroughly tested, and safety and effectiveness may not be proven. Brands may be made differently, with variable ingredients, even within the same brand. The below doses may not apply to all products. You should read product labels, and discuss doses with a qualified healthcare provider before starting therapy.

  • Adults (18 years and older)

    • There is no proven effective dose for banaba. For diabetes, 32 and 48 milligrams daily for two weeks has been used.
  • Children (younger than 18 years)

    • There is no proven effective dose for banaba in children.

Safety

    Disclaimer

    The U.S. Food and Drug Administration does not strictly regulate herbs and supplements. There is no guarantee of strength, purity or safety of products, and effects may vary. You should always read product labels. If you have a medical condition, or are taking other drugs, herbs, or supplements, you should speak with a qualified healthcare provider before starting a new therapy. Consult a healthcare provider immediately if you experience side effects.

  • Allergies

    • Avoid in individuals with a known allergy or hypersensitivity to banaba or its constituents.
  • Side Effects and Warnings

    • Banaba is generally considered to be safe when taken by mouth for up to 15 days for the treatment of type II diabetes. No adverse effects have been noted in the available research. Use cautiously in patients with diabetes since banaba may lower blood sugar.
  • Pregnancy and Breastfeeding

    • Banaba is not recommended in pregnant or breastfeeding women due to a lack of available scientific evidence.

Interactions

    Disclaimer

    Most herbs and supplements have not been thoroughly tested for interactions with other herbs, supplements, drugs, or foods. The interactions listed below are based on reports in scientific publications, laboratory experiments, or traditional use. You should always read product labels. If you have a medical condition, or are taking other drugs, herbs, or supplements, you should speak with a qualified healthcare provider before starting a new therapy.

  • Interactions with Drugs

    • Lagerstroemia indica has been shown to produce antithrombin activity. Caution is advised in patients with bleeding disorders or taking drugs that may increase the risk of bleeding. Dosing adjustments may be necessary.
    • Theoretically, banaba has been shown to produce insulin-like actions and therefore banaba may have additive effects when taken concomitantly with diabetic drugs. Medication adjustments may be necessary.
    • Caution is advised when taking concomitantly with xanthine oxidases.
  • Interactions with Herbs and Dietary Supplements

    • Lagerstroemia indica has been shown to produce antithrombin activity. Caution is advised in patients with bleeding disorders or taking herbs or supplements that may increase the risk of bleeding. Multiple cases of bleeding have been reported with the use of Ginkgo biloba, and fewer cases with garlic and saw palmetto. Numerous other agents may theoretically increase the risk of bleeding, although this has not been proven in most cases.
    • Banaba may lower blood sugar levels. Caution is advised when taking banaba with other herbs or supplements that may potentially alter blood sugar, such as fenugreek, garlic, or horse chestnut. Blood glucose levels may require monitoring, and doses may need adjustment.

Attribution

  • This information is based on a systematic review of scientific literature edited and peer-reviewed by contributors to the Natural Standard Research Collaboration ().

Bibliography

    Disclaimer

    Natural Standard developed the above evidence-based information based on a thorough systematic review of the available scientific articles. For comprehensive information about alternative and complementary therapies on the professional level, go to . Selected references are listed below.

  • Chistokhodova N, Nguyen C, Calvino T, et al. Antithrombin activity of medicinal plants from central Florida. J Ethnopharmacol 2002;81(2):277-280.
    View Abstract
  • Garcia LL, Fojas FR, Castro IR, et al. Pharmaceuticochemical and pharmacological studies on a crude drug from Lagerstroemia speciosa (L.) Pers. Philippine J Sci 1987;116:361-375.
  • Hattori K, Sukenobu N, Sasaki T, et al. Activation of insulin receptors by lagerstroemin. J Pharmacol Sci 2003;93(1):69-73.
    View Abstract
  • Hayashi T, Maruyama H, Kasai R, et al. Ellagitannins from Lagerstroemia speciosa as activators of glucose transport in fat cells. Planta Med 2002;68(2):173-175.
    View Abstract
  • Hong H, Jai Maeng W. Effects of malted barley extract and banaba extract on blood glucose levels in genetically diabetic mice. J Med Food 2004;7(4):487-490.
    View Abstract
  • Hosoyama H, Sugimoto A, Suzuki Y, et al. [Isolation and quantitative analysis of the alpha-amylase inhibitor in Lagerstroemia speciosa (L.) Pers. (Banaba)]. Yakugaku Zasshi 2003;123(7):599-605.
    View Abstract
  • Judy WV, Hari SP, Stogsdill WW, et al. Antidiabetic activity of a standardized extract (Glucosol) from Lagerstroemia speciosa leaves in Type II diabetics. A dose-dependence study. J Ethnopharmacol 2003;87(1):115-117.
    View Abstract
  • Kakuda T, Sakane I, Takihara T, et al. Hypoglycemic effect of extracts from Lagerstroemia speciosa L. leaves in genetically diabetic KK-AY mice. Biosci Biotechnol Biochem 1996;60(2):204-208.
    View Abstract
  • Matsuura T, Yoshikawa Y, Masui H, et al. [Suppression of glucose absorption by various health teas in rats.] [Article in Japanese.]. Yakugaku Zasshi 4;124(4):217-223.
    View Abstract
  • Murakami C, Myoga K, Kasai R, et al. Screening of plant constituents for effect on glucose transport activity in Ehrlich ascites tumour cells. Chem Pharm Bull (Tokyo) 1993;41(12):2129-2131.
    View Abstract
  • Suzuki Y, Unno T, Ushitani M, et al. Antiobesity activity of extracts from Lagerstroemia speciosa L. leaves on female KK-Ay mice. J Nutr Sci Vitaminol (Tokyo) 1999;45(6):791-795.
    View Abstract
  • Unno T, Sugimoto A, Kakuda T. Xanthine oxidase inhibitors from the leaves of Lagerstroemia speciosa (L.) Pers. J Ethnopharmacol 2004;93(2-3):391-395.
    View Abstract